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IRS Revenue Procedure 2011-14 Energy efficiency and claiming the 179D deduction

The 179D tax deduction came about as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Congress wanted to incentivize the utilization of energy-efficiency components in a building to one of the following parties:

1.The owner of the building
2.The tenant
3.The primary designer of an energy-efficient government building. (Architect, engineer, contractor etc.)

The deduction available is up to $.60 per sq./ft. for lighting, HVAC and building envelope, creating potential for $1.80 per sq./ft. if all three components qualify. These deductions are applicable to buildings that were either built or retrofitted after 12/31/2005.

Since EPAct came into effect, the IRS has provided interim guidance on EPAct deductions through several additional notices. IRS Notice 2006-52 describes in detail the rules and how to ensure a building qualifies if it was a new build or a retrofit. It requires the taxpayer to obtain certification that the property satisfies the energy efficiency requirements of 179D and specifies the software that must be used to calculate energy and power consumption. To further the cause, the IRS issued Notice 2008-40, which allowed a government building (non-taxpaying entity) to pass the deduction to the “primary designer” of the qualifying assets.

Until recently, taxpayers looking to claim the 179D deduction were limited by the three year statute of limitations for filing amended income tax returns for a particular tax year. That has changed with the issuance of Revenue Procedure 2011-14, which will allow some taxpayers to bypass this statute of limitations and claim this deduction all the way back to 1/1/2006 without filing one single amended income tax return. Taxpayers who wish to take the deduction without amending any returns will file a Form 3115 (Application for Change in Accounting Method) and will get to take the entire “catch up” deduction on the return that is being filed. This means that a taxpayer could potentially claim deductions from 2006-2010 (or 2011) all on one return and significantly reduce their tax burden, if not eliminate it altogether.

Deciding whether or not to amend returns or file for a Change in Accounting Method (Form 3115) is entirely dependent upon each taxpayers situation. If taxable income was higher in open years and therefore the taxpayer was in a higher tax bracket, it still may make sense to amend those returns. The impact of Revenue Procedure 2011-14 will also depend on whether or not any deductions have already been claimed or returns have been amended. A thorough analysis of each taxpayers scenario by an advisor experienced in 179D is advantageous to determining the best approach and claiming the maximum deduction allowed under the law.

Most Popular Fixes To Increase Home Comfort And Energy Efficiency

Keeping your home comfort levels high while maintaining an efficient home does not have to be difficult. In fact, there are several small things you can do around your home with very little money that will increase your comfort levels while decreasing your bills.

Insulate Electrical Outlets and Switches

A lot of energy is lost through drafty switches and sockets. You can purchase small kits at any big box retailer or home improvement store that will allow you to insulate all of your switches and outlets. Depending on the size of your home, you can typically do this for under $50.

Update Old Windows

Old windows can wreak havoc on your heating and cooling system. You may have to spend some money to replace the windows, but in most cases if you choose energy efficient windows you will make that money back in utility savings in just a few years. If you do not have the money to replace all the windows, do what you can and work on insulating the rest. Even just replacing the caulk around the windows can dramatically improve a drafty room. In the winter you can find plastic kits that will seal the windows, helping to improve the efficiency.

Check the Doors

Doors are another big source of heat loss during the winter. Cool air from indoors can also seep out during the summer months. You do not have to replace your doors to help fix this problem. If the doors are in good condition, consider using an expanding foam to reduce gaps around the door frame.

Sealing Vents

Laundry vents, outdoor faucets, and other types of hook ups can create energy loss. Walk around the outside perimeter of your home and inspect for these areas that could be insulated. Insulating and sealing these items can create a much more efficient home.

Attic Insulation

A good layer of insulation in your attic will prevent heat from escaping through the ceiling and roof of your home. You can do this on your own with just a small investment in the insulation. You can also hire a professional to blow in the insulation if you do not want to deal with this on your own.

Simple Additions

Another way to increase your homes comfort and lower bills is by adding small details such as insulated curtains. These will help prevent air from escaping and can be purchased for around $30 a set. If you have hardwood floors, adding a throw rug to rooms that are heavily populated will actually help maintain the temperature.
Professional Inspections

At least once a year you should have your heating and cooling system inspected. This will alert you of any potential problems, and can help you maintain your homes comfort while keeping your utility bills in check. If you have a service contract with a company this is typically covered. If not, it does not cost a lot of money to have an inspection done annually.

Smart Buildings – More Than Just Energy Efficiency

The smartest people in the commercial real estate industry agree–if we really got energy efficiency in buildings right using smart building technologies, corporations could save so much money that there would be little need for solar panels or windmills. While most experts are still strong supporters of these alternative energy sources, they agree that extreme energy efficiency measures could have very dramatic positive results.

On the other hand, there are an increasing number of people who are growing disenchanted with the energy efficiency movement. It is not that they are against the idea, it just seems like it is an “all or nothing” proposition, and one of the major aspects of smart building technologies is the impact they can have on OPERATIONS and TENANT SAFETY/SATISFACTION as well as energy efficiency–which solar panels and windmills don’t offer.
In our world of buildings, a world that impacts us every time we enter an office, mall, school or sporting venue, and an environment that requires a great degree of operational support, why totally ignore the operational benefits, financial and human productivity possibilities, and tenant safety/satisfaction potential of intelligent, connected, high performance smart buildings?

This new generation of smart buildings, in which an IT infrastructure is laid on top of a building and every electro-mechanical device is IP enabled and connected with the ability to send data and be controlled, can provide energy savings and a WHOLE LOT MORE. The concept of centralized portfolio control with dramatically reengineered workflow, combined with advanced data analytics and visualization, could have an equal (if not greater) impact on the operational and tenant satisfaction bottom line of a building when comparing energy efficiency and savings.

Building owners care a lot about the costs of running a building. If these state of the art concepts and technologies can significantly reduce operating costs, why not exploit that fact? These details should be included in the overall strategy when cost-justifying the retrofitting of existing buildings. It makes sense to look at every aspect of these intelligent and smart buildings. Go through the front door with energy efficiency but, by no means stop there; operational efficiency and tenant satisfaction will round out the complete justification for making smart building investments.

One small, yet interesting example of this approach would be the management of fire extinguishers. Despite more technology in an iPhone than we had on the first space launch, we continue each month to walk every square foot of our buildings in search of a fire extinguisher with a small paper card attached and a hole to punch. With some pretty basic smart building technology, we can connect those fire extinguishers to a network and monitor them in real time, with almost no future financial investment. This also has a good sustainability aspect, as we are not using natural resources to transport humans in their search for cards to punch.

Another area relevant to smart building technology with a very fast payback is digital signage. Despite the fact that the hardware and technology costs have become very competitive, we continue to rely on analog solutions to communicate information in our lobbies. If you look at the cost and process, with multiple people and methods of getting a tenant’s name up on a lobby sign, it is a very inefficient way to communicate tenant information. In addition to a simple tenant directory, digital signage can also offer advertising (potential revenues), and fire life safety information in the event of an emergency.

Many different areas of a building’s operations would benefit greatly from automation: HVAC, lighting, security/access, energy, fire/life/safety, lifts, water management, landscaping/irrigation, audio visual, digital signage, parking, voice/data and more.

If we truly want to take our buildings to the next level of sophistication and take advantage of all available technologies, then start thinking of the three categories that make a smart building–energy efficiency and conservation, operational efficiency, tenant safety and satisfaction. If we include all of these categories in our financial justification models, it becomes a much easier decision to retrofit and move our buildings into the 21st century.

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Fastest Growing Data Center Trend In 2013 Energy Efficiency

Energy efficiency continues to be a major concern for data centers with raised floor systems. In the past, energy cost was simply a given, on par with the costof hardware and labor. As hardware has become more efficient and automated procedures have taken over labor, the cost of energy has continued to climb and it now represents around 25% of total operating costs for most data centers. In most data centers, one of the biggest uses of energy involves the strategic cooling of equipment in conjunction with the raised floor system.

The typical data center uses nearly twice as much electricity as it needs for actual computing, with the remainder going toward cooling, lighting and systems that maintain the data center. One measure of this ratio of use is PUE, or power usage effectiveness, and a PUE of 1.0 is considered ideal. This means all of the power brought to the data center is used for computing, although this is not exactly an achievable goal.

The price of energy is such a large concern for data centers, they have gone to great lengths to optimize their PUE. The largest operators of data centers, Google and Facebook, have not only worked to make their data centers energy efficient. they have come close to this ideal PUE. Along the way, they have learned some valuable lessons to save energy. Their work has been amazing and shows the possibilities in new construction. However, it challenges the vast majority of older data centers with raised access floor. For data centers built 10 to 40 years ago, all hope is not lost. There are a number of ways to follow this trend without spending a fortune to take advantage of the lessons learned in energy efficiency.

Energy Efficiency for Legacy Data Centers
Legacy data centers may use a number of cost-effective techniques to boost the energy efficiency of their facility and improve the performance of their raised floor systems.

Energy Efficient Grommets
One option is sealing existing cutouts in raised floor systems for a fast and effective energy facelift. Energy efficient grommets are an effective way to prevent bypass air from escaping the underfloor to improve the efficiency and cooling capacity of the entire system. According to Uptime Institute, Inc., electricity consumed by a data center’s IT equipment is the largest infrastructure cost, and up to 80% of conditioned air never reaches the air intake of equipment due to unsealed cable openings.

Bypass air creates hot spots, which causes not only inefficiency but increased costs. Sealing cable and hose openings is one of the most cost-effective ways to update an existing raised floor system, and energy efficient grommets will not only increase the cooling capacity of existing units but also reduce the need to buy additional cooling units.

Perforated Raised Floor Tiles
Another option is the strategic installation of perforated raised floor tiles or high velocity grates. A major study conducted by the Uptime Institution of 19 large computer rooms determined that most facilities have problems with hot spots. Many data centers simply throw more AC at the problem, which most often fails. These perforated data center floor tiles must be installed with a plan in mind, however, and not simply because an area feels warm.

When cable openings are sealed, the airflow of perforated floor tiles is increased by 66%. Airflow modeling will allow for the strategic placement and quantity needed of perforated floor tiles or high velocity grates.

Rack System Layout
Finally, it’s possible to improve the cooling and power efficiency of legacy raised floor systems by re-examining the current rack layout. More data centers today use in-row solutions, which maximizes efficiency. Cabinets should be joined in a series of rows resting on the raised floor tiles. The fronts of the racks facing each other become cold aisles. Cold aisles are then positioned around the perimeter of the room, or at the end of hot aisles, and this pushes cold air under the raised floor system and through the cold aisle. Perforated raised floor tiles are then placed only in the cold aisles to concentrate the cool air in front of the racks to make sure adequate air reaches the server intake. As air moves through the servers, it’s heated and dissipated into hot aisles.

Implementing a strategic energy plan can make any data center more efficient, whether new or old.

Illuminating The Future Of Kitchen Lighting Energy Efficiency By Capitol Lighting

It doesn’t matter if you live in a home with a modern kitchen that has all the fancy upgrades, or one that just has a single overhead light in the center of the room. If you’re not using the latest generation of energy-efficient bulbs, it’s time for a lighting upgrade.

“Kitchen lighting has made great strides in the past couple of years, not just from a design standpoint, but with regards to energy efficiency. So upgrades are definitely worth looking into,” says Joe Rey-Barreau, education consultant for the American Lighting Association (ALA) and an associate professor at the University of Kentucky’s School of Interior Design. He travels the country tracking trends, and one he’s noticed lately is the focus on energy conservation.

“Lighting manufacturers are spending a considerable amount of time, and dedicating a lot of resources to developing fixtures capable of using more energy-efficient light sources than the standard incandescent,” Rey-Barreau says. “And it’s no coincidence that this trend is growing in popularity at a time when energy costs are on the rise,” he says.

As recently as two years ago, the only fixtures available for the kitchen that used the most energy-efficient light sources available today – fluorescents and Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) – were not aesthetically pleasing. In today’s marketplace, however, decorative energy-efficient fixtures are available in every product category, whether you’re looking for something traditional, modern or artsy.

“We know consumers want to capitalize on the fact that compact fluorescent bulbs are approximately three to four times more efficient than incandescent bulbs, and LEDs can be three to 10 times more efficient, so we’ve dedicated a lot of resources to developing new fixtures that utilize the technology,” says Scott Roos, vice president of product design for Juno Lighting Group. “We’ll be introducing an LED under-cabinet unit in the fall that requires just eight watts of energy to provide the same illumination as an 80-watt halogen light source. Our new LED down light will be 40 percent more energy efficient than a compact fluorescent and 75 percent more energy efficient than an incandescent.”

Holtkoetter International, Inc., a manufacturer of residential lighting fixtures based in St. Paul, Minn., plans to release several models of fixtures that use LEDs early next year. But energy-saving products are nothing new for Holtkoetter. “We’ve been offering fixtures that take halogen IRC bulbs, capable of improving energy efficiency by 50 percent, for the last five years,” says company president Paul Eusterbrock.

Infra Red Coating (IRC) bulbs are designed in such a way that the heat they generate can be recycled and turned into light.

Hubbardton Forge, a lighting manufacturer out of Chandler, Vt., meantime has concentrated its efforts on developing decorative fixtures that take compact fluorescents. “We have offerings in every category for decorative fixtures that really enhance what you get out of a compact fluorescent,” says George Chandler, president of Hubbardton Forge.

No matter which of the new technologies you choose to go with, when shopping for energy-efficient fixtures, Rey-Barreau says it is important to look for the Energy Star label. In order to qualify for the Energy Star designation, the product must meet specific performance criteria for energy-efficient performance set by the U.S. Department of Energy.

As for concerns people may have about the quality of light given off by compact fluorescents and LEDs, Rey-Barreau says that “while in the past color rendering may have been a concern, it is no longer a problem. Consumers can rest assured the quality closely matches that of incandescents.”

Today’s advancements are quite impressive, but what does the future hold? Rey-Barreau expects the lighting industry to work hard at getting more products on the shelves that use the most energy-efficient technology developed to date – LEDs. “Right now LEDs are still kind of expensive, but once they become more readily available, the cost will come down significantly,” he says.

Energy Efficiency And Roof Design

As a roofing contractor in the state of Wisconsin, I continually field requests for light colored (reflective) roofing for the purpose of energy efficiency. A white or light colored roof will reflect sunlight, keep the building cooler, and reduce energy consumptionCorrect?

It depends on where you live and the insulation value of the building.

Most roofing material comes in a variety of colors. EPDM (rubber) membrane, for instance, is a very common low slope roofing material that comes in black or white. In the case of EPDM, the white color is much more expensive. Many consumers will justify spending more on white instead of black EPDM since they believe that there will be energy savings. Asphalt shingles come in a variety of different colors from light to dark. Some shingle manufacturers, such as GAF, have marketed Cool Series asphalt shingles that are designed to be more reflective of sunlight.

Significant studies have been conducted to study the effect of roof color on energy consumption. Heat transfer will occur from the roof into the interior of the building if there is a low level of insulation and resulting low R-Value (thermal resistance). As R-value and thermal resistance increases with better insulation systems, the type and color of roofing material becomes less and less important. In general, an R-value of 30 or more negates any energy efficiency gains from white or light colored roofing material in hot climates. It stands to reason the most effective way to decrease a buildings energy consumption is to increase insulation levels.

There are situations in which the building structure itself cannot be insulated more effectively and a low R-value cannot be avoided. What color of roofing material would be best in this situation? It depends on where you live and the climate. Do you have more heating degree days or cooling degree days? Here in Wisconsin, we definitely have more heating degree days. Therefore, a dark colored roof will help heat interior building spaces and decrease energy consumption over time. In colder climates, dark colored roofs are the most energy efficient. The opposite is true for hot climates. It would be well worth the extra investment in purchasing white roofing material in Southern Florida. Central regions of the United States are considered color-neutral. In these areas, studies have shown that energy efficiency is not impacted by roof color.

With the increase in roofing material choices, it has become increasingly important that roof designers, contractors, and facilities managers consider the right roofing material for the right situation. Reflective roofing has become a knee-jerk reaction for some designers and contractors who do not take climate zones or insulation levels into consideration. Focus should remain on insulation systems and improving insulation value when optimizing energy efficiency. Advances in insulation technology have created opportunities to increase insulation value in almost any circumstance. Spray-on foam insulation and plywood manufactured with imbedded rigid foam insulation have become popular and effective systems to increase R-value in tight spaces.

Every building and every roof system is different. Roof design for energy efficiency must take into consideration climate zone and insulation value. With sufficient insulation, roof color becomes insignificant in the energy efficiency equation.

Engage energy efficiency in your home with new double glazing windows.

If you are looking for double glazing Windows Essex can offer you Dolphin Windows whom have over 20 years experience in the installation of windows, doors and conservatories. Dolphin Windows offer quality workmanship and professional installation by highly trained qualified experts.

Double glazing windows are available in many different styles to suit period properties or for personal taste and requirements. All windows come with the latest security features, alongside being highly energy efficient. Double glazing windows keep noise out meaning the noise of passing large vehicles will be a lot quieter than they would be if you were to have standard windows in your home. Dolphin Windows supply precise windows to fit perfectly in your home alongside tilt windows which open in a traditional manner and also tilt inwards allowing the circulation of air. Double glazing windows will keep the heat out during the summer months and will keep the heat in during the winter months ensuring your home is kept at a temperature you like.

If you would like to add value to your home Dolphin Windows recommending adding a conservatory which is aesthetically pleasing and has the energy efficiency many people are looking for today, Dolphin Windows’ outstanding conservatories are guaranteed to please and at competitive prices anyone can afford a high quality Dolphin Windows conservatory. Dolphin Windows have the latest in conservatory windows so that you are able to match the style of your conservatory to the style of your home. A conservatory helps bring the outside in with large windows giving your home a nice summary feel at all times of the year, a conservatory allows you to enjoy your beautiful garden on days where it’s just a bit too windy to enjoy being sat outside and in winter you can enjoy the view of the perfect snow in your garden.

The leading experts at Dolphin Windows offer a professional service in the installation of conservatories and double glazing windows. Dolphin Windows tailor their services to the needs of the individual customer to ensure you receive the best service that they can offer you.

Dolphin Windows are members of Network VEKA meaning they offer a ‘peace of mind’ service. Members of Network VEKA have an excellent quality service and lots of experience in the installation of double glazing windows and conservatories. Homeowners can trust Dolphin Windows knowing they are backed by a stable and powerful national organisation.

Does High Amplifier Energy Efficiency Mean High Cost

If you are about to acquire a new stereo amplifier, you may be concerned about how efficiently your amp works. I will show you exactly what the term “power efficiency” means plus why you need to take a closer look at this number in your selection of a brand new amplifier.

A fairly large amount of power is radiated as heat should you get a low-efficiency amp. This can contribute to several issues: Amps that have small power efficiency are going to waste some energy. It is smart to bear in mind the added energy expense while choosing between a high- and low-efficiency product. The squandered energy is radiated by the amp as heat. Amplifiers that have lower efficiency typically have various heat sinks to help dissipate the wasted energy. These heat sinks use up a good amount of space and make the amplifier large and heavy. Further, they raise the price of the amp. To help radiate heat, low-power-efficiency amplifiers need to have adequate air movement. As a result they can not be placed in areas with no circulation. Also, they cannot be installed inside water-resistant enclosures.

Amplifiers that have low efficiency require a bigger power source to create the identical amount of audio power as high-efficiency products. Further, because of the large level of heat, there will be significantly greater thermal stress on the electrical elements and also interior materials which may cause dependability complications. In contrast, high-efficiency amplifiers can be made small and light.

While buying an amplifier, you’ll find the efficiency in the data sheet. This figure is frequently shown as a percentage. Class-A amplifiers are amongst the least efficient and provide a efficiency of around 25% only. On the other hand, switching amplifiers, also referred to as “Class-D” amplifiers provide efficiencies of up to 98%. Acquiring an amplifier which has an efficiency of 90% as an example shows that 10% of the energy that is used is squandered while 90% will be audio power.

Then again, there are a few things to note about power efficiency. First of all, this figure will depend on on the level of energy that the amplifier is providing. Amplifiers have greater efficiency while delivering larger output power than when operating at low power mainly because of the fixed power that they consume irrespective of the output power. The efficiency value in the amp data sheet is usually provided for the greatest amplifier output power.

To determine the power efficiency, the audio energy that is used by a power resistor which is connected to the amplifier is divided by the overall energy the amp consumes while being fed a constant sine wave signal. Since the efficiency is dependent upon the audio power, usually the output power is swept and an efficiency graph generated which can display the amplifier efficiency for each level of output power.

When choosing a sound amp you will need to weigh efficiency versus fidelity given that low-efficiency analog amps frequently deliver the maximum audio fidelity whilst digital models will have greater distortion. However, digital amplifiers have come a long way and are offering better music fidelity than in the past. Class-T amplifiers come close to the music fidelity of analog amps. Due to this fact picking a switching amplifier with good audio fidelity is now possible.

Line Losses A Different Kind Of Energy Efficiency

It’s a homeowner’s responsibility to make sure that he or she is using appliances that are energy efficient. Replacing a twenty-year-old refrigerator is likely to reduce your electricity bill because a new ENERGY STAR-rated icebox has been designed to do more while using less of the juice. Energy efficiency, however, is not just a concern for the little guy. Utility companies must worry about “line losses,” the electricity that is lost as a result of the inherent inefficiency of the generation and transmission system. In places like Texas and New York, however, engineers are thinking of ways to prevent this waste. Best of all, the savings will be passed on to you, the consumer.

What causes this loss of energy in the first place? There are many reasons, including the flaws in electrical cables and the natural tendency toward entropy. (That’s the principle that says that systems tend to become more disordered over time.) Jim Landers, a columnist for the Dallas Morning News, explains that small amounts of electricity turn into heat as it runs through a conductor. This is one of the reasons that power adaptors can feel warm to the touch when you try to unplug them. This unwanted heat isn’t such a big deal for appliances with short cables. When you think of power transmission cables and the hundreds of miles they can traverse, you can understand why line losses are such a big concern.

In Texas, line loss results in the waste of 6.5% of all the Texas electricity generated in the Lone Star State. While that might not sound like very much, it starts to add up when you think of it in terms of your pocketbook. For every one hundred dollars you pay for Texas electricity, inefficiencies account for $6.50. One way to reduce that amount is to replace old, lower capacity transmission cables with more advanced lines that can handle the kind of high voltages that keep the lights on in modern cities. Landers note that there are plans in place to connect the wind farms of West Texas to the rest of the state via 345-kilovolt lines that boast only 4% inefficiency.

Much like Texans, New Yorkers know what it’s like to need a vast supply of reliable New York electricity. To reduce the effect of line losses, engineers have developed synchrophasors. According to the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI), computers can measure voltage running through a line at very high speed. With this detailed information about the flow of energy, utilities can better manipulate the grid to reduce the stress on the system and eliminate some of that waste. For example, if a power plant malfunctions, thereby causing the voltage in the system to fluctuate, the use of synchrophasors allows authorities to quickly address the situation before it causes increased waste. (Or worse, an interruption in supply.)

Matthew L. Wald, a writer for the New York Times, sees the benefits of synchrophasors, reminding readers that current monitoring devices only provide measurements every two to four seconds. The kind of synchrophasors that are being installed in New York and in the Midwest are able to provide feedback thirty times a second, allowing computers to regulate energy flow more fortuitously.

The devices themselves aren’t too expensive: approximately two to three thousand dollars for each synchrophasor. The real cost is derived from the computer and networking system that allows it to interact with the energy grid. Some of this money comes from the Energy Department, but even if residents end up paying to equip the grid with this technology, it’s the kind of wise long-term strategy that will result in long-term savings.

While it certainly will not be cheap to invest so much to establish a more efficient electric grid, it’s also a vital part of a greener future. Wind farms and solar facilities are (just like old-fashioned natural gas and coal power generation plants) often located far away from densely populated areas. As a result, utilities must run miles and miles of cable, resulting in greater line loss. If alternative energies can be more easily worked into the grid, we’ll all save money and enjoy a healthier environment. So the next time you read about improvements being made by state or local electric utilities, remember that something as simple as the cable strung between your home and the power plant can have a big effect on your monthly bill.

Energy Efficiency Is The Only Way To Reduce Fuel Bills

With an average energy bill set to climb to 1406 in 2009 (from 676 in 2005), the Government has given a commitment to help consumers improve household energy efficiency and permanently bring down energy bills.

As the nation waits for confirmation of where Government support will be given, many organisations are offering advice and guidance into where and how families can make changes that will cut their household energy costs.

Figures from the Energy Savings Trust suggest that if everyone undertook a number of simple measures including: Fitting energy saving light bulbs, double glazed windows, installing a condensing boiler, cavity wall and loft insulation and jackets for hot water tanks, UK households could reduce energy bills by over 270 a year and save over 1.9bn in fuel costs*.

Paul Kellett, Technical Director at Anglian Home Improvements, an Energy Savings Trust recommended supplier said: It is increasingly becoming apparent that current fuel price increases are set to have dramatic effects on many peoples household bills.

But making energy efficient changes, ahead of the winter months, could lead to savings of thousands of pound on future fuel bills – as well as adding to a houses value. If people are considering making improvements we would urge them to look at the most energy efficient options.

Installing double glazing for example, cuts heat lost through windows by half. At Anglian we fit B-rated energy saving double glazing as standard, which offers potential savings of over 110 per year per household.

Further estimations on savings to be gained from implementing energy efficiency measures in the home include*:
Around a third of all the heat lost in an un-insulated home is lost through the walls. Fitting cavity wall insulation could save up to 120 on an annual fuel bill
Insulating an uninsulated loft can save around 155 a year If everyone in the UK topped up their loft insulation to 270mm, around 560m would be saved each year. That’s enough money to pay the annual fuel bills of around 530,000 families.
An ultra efficient condensing boiler will be 20% more efficient and could save up to 130 on heating bills.
Fitting an insulating jacket to the hot water cylinder could save around 30 per year
Setting hot water cylinder thermostats to 60C/140F could save up to 10 over the year
Using low energy light bulbs to save 10 on electricity bills each year.
By installing draught proofing you could save around 25 a year on your heating bills

Financial help may be available if you’re planning to make energy saving improvements to your home

*Figures are from www.energysavingstrust.org.uk